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Media Room Kelli Newman Myers
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(614) 645-7213 
knmyers@columbus.gov

Columbus Public Health notified of Rabid Bat found in Arena District on August 19, 2018

Columbus Public Health notified of Rabid Bat found in Arena District on August 19, 2018

Anyone Who Touched the Bat on August 19 Only should consider Rabies Vaccine

 

WHAT:          On Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018 around 9 p.m., a live bat was found on the sidewalk in the 200 block at the corner of John H. McConnell Blvd. and Nationwide Blvd. near Nationwide Arena. This bat was taken to the Ohio Wildlife Center by the person that was walking by and saw the bat. Columbus Public Health learned today that the bat tested positive for rabies virus.

 

Anyone who touched this bat, or had contact with a bat in that location prior to 9 p.m. on Aug. 19, should get vaccinated for rabies.

The risk for exposure to this bat was ONLY on Aug. 19, 2018 and the risk for exposure to this bat is gone. However, anyone who touched this specific bat or who had contact with a bat in that area on Aug. 19 prior to 9 p.m. should contact Columbus Public Health at 614-645-1474 - opt 2.

 

DETAILS:       Rabies in humans is 100 percent preventable through prompt appropriate medical care.

Rabies is a virus that attacks the nerves and brain tissue of most mammals. The rabies virus is transmitted through saliva or brain/nervous system tissue. You can only get rabies by coming in contact with these specific bodily excretions and tissues.

The first symptoms of rabies may be similar to the flu, including general weakness or discomfort, fever or headache. These symptoms may last for days.

There also may be discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the site of bite, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral dysfunction, anxiety, confusion and agitation. As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations and insomnia.

Once clinical signs of rabies appear, the disease is nearly always fatal. Once a person begins to exhibit signs of the disease, survival is rare.

 

INFO:              https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/

 

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